5 THE most Feattured Networks

” title=”5 THE most Feattured Networks”>5 THE most Feattured Networks

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Formulas that effectively measure social network involvement

Formulas that effectively measure social network involvement.

What does an indicator such as “level of involvement” measure?

As far as social media, analytics is a relatively new area.

It is important to accurately represent measuring techniques as calculated by specific indicators.

For example, let’s take one of the key indicators: taking into account user interaction with a Facebook page. What does it measure? General definition states: “The level of involvement shows how fans interact with your content.” What does mean practically? For example, if your level of involvement is 0.02%, does this mean that only 0.02% of your fans somehow interact with your content?

If you look at the most common formula, they do not measure involvement accurately:

1st

The first problem:

It does not account for all interactions. Don’t you think that there is something missing? What about the videos and photos, or click on links? Are these actions not also a big part of the involvement?

For example, for brands in fashion, e-commerce, or even auto manufacturers these actions can be among the most important and make up 80% of all interactions. But in this formula, these actions are not taken into account! And then we shouldn’t be surprised that the level of involvement of the fans does not exceed 0.2%.

The second problem:

The formula is based only on the number of fans. Brands need to focus on engaging their audience, rather than the number of fans their page has.

Facebook is a great field for viral marketing (to convert friends to fans), and should not focus on the number of fan pages themselves. Especially when you consider that about 84% of the fans have never even seen your content.

Let’s compare two pages

2nd

Which one can be considered the most effective?

The second page seems to be as it has twice as many fans and more interactions. But this is not true. Let’s use a different metric.

3rd

If you measure the level of involvement by calculating the number of fans, it means you are trying to hide the truth: is the user who sees your content a fan? Do you really care about this? At first glance, the page with the worst parameters, but with the most shares, as well as with the fans who have many friends will work much better than a page with fewer fans and more interactions, but the coverage is poor. The presented formula should determine how well your content attracts users, but it does not. It does not take into consideration users who will not be able to access that content (and if they do not see it, they can comment or “like”). Moreover the formula does not take into account those who actually interact with your content.

The third problem:

The formula brings down everything: fans, and non-fans. it is like comparing apples and pears. The formula mixes the results of fan and non-fan actions. This approach creates a more favorable level of involvement. To be precise, the formula should count all “Likes”, comments, shares and views by all non-fans as well.

The fourth problem:

The formula gives preference to pages which contain more content. If you want to increase your level of involvement, you have to post more often – it’s very simple, and most importantly, it works: 1. You will reach more fans – this means that more people will see your content and this may increase your leads. 2. Each user (no matter whether they are your fan or not) will have more opportunities to “like” your content and share it too.

The Fifth problem:

The formula doesn’t measure users, but their interactions.

4th

We want to understand how our fans interact with the content, but we do not measure unique visitors – we measure only the number of interactions, such as “Likes” or “Comments” and shares.

The SOLUTION:

When you use this formula, you get an exact idea of the interaction from fans or users, and when your content works. Publishing useless content leads to the ridiculously low level of involvement. Of course, this formula can be useful, for example, from the point of view of comparison with your competitors, even if it is somewhat biased.

But in my opinion the level of involvement has nothing to do with engagement; rather it calculates a “level of activity.”

The following formula can measure engagement:

5th

This formula has a number of advantages that make it more accurate:

• It includes all types of interaction: viewing photos and videos, clicking on the link and so on, not just likes, comments, and shares It compares the involvement of both fans and non-fans;

• It includes only those people who have had a chance to see your content (and, therefore, interact with it.);

• It does not include the impact of the frequency of publications. And most importantly, this formula gives the answer to the question: “Does my content encourage involvement or not?”

AS well using this formula you can improve your SEO.

With this formula, your level of involvement will reach 30%, 40, 50% or even more.

Read also

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Facebook Ad Tips

Social Impact Measuring

izWiseMetrics Research and Glabex.com Research